A ray of sunshine breaks through the clouds. A light mist is in the air. After the coolness of the winter soil temperatures are beginning to warm. And you know what that means- it’s weeding time! Sometimes the first course of defense against weeds is to catch them early, especially before a million seeds are dispersed through the wind. I’m in the garden all year long, but I make a diligent attempt to get out in the early spring at the first sign of those weeds like “hairy bittercress” (among other common names) that pop-up everywhere.

A good layer of Lane Garden Compost or Blended Mint Compost applied after the weeding is wrapped up is a good preventative measure, giving your plants moisture retention and nourishment on those hot summer days. Keeping weeds in check early in the season is preventative but also ensures they aren’t taking away nutrients from your plants. Now is the time to stop into any of our locations to pick up some compost- by the bucket, bag or by the cubic yard!

This is also a good time to begin raking up leaves and pulling them back from dahlias, fuchsias or any over wintering perennials you may have covered to keep the frost away. While in the garden you also notice several bulbs likes Alliums (ornamental onions), Iris, and Hemercocallis fulva (Daylilies) popping through the soil. Digitalis (Foxglove), Peonies and Lupinus (Lupines) are also great for adding color this time of year. These flowers tend to bloom late spring and into the early summer. (depending on the variety -Digitalis or Lupinus may extend bloom into late summer.)

Spring is certainly in the air, soon the bees will be buzzing around the Ceanothus thyrsiflorus along the property. This is a fast-growing deer resistant shrub makes it a nice hedge. Although there are many common names, it’s often referred to as a “California lilac” because of the small, but very prolific purple flowers. Ceanothus thyrsiflorus ‘Victoria’ is one of hardiest for this region. Stop into our Corner Store Nursery today to check out our selection!
Written by Karen Smith, Lane Forest Products Plant Specialist